Recommended Reading

As mentioned in the most recent MeetUp, I will be posting regular suggestions as recommended reading: Clinical Relevance of Fascial Tissue and Dysfunction. Klingler W, Velders M, Hoppe K, Schleip R. Curr Pain Headache Rep (2014) 18: 439 Targeted Nurtition Part II: Breaking down, starting up: can a vitamin C–enriched gelatin supplement before exercise increase…

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Fascia And Nutrition Part II

As we learned last week, the Standard Australian/American (S.A.D) Diet leaves a lot to be desired, the end result over time can be obesity and general poor health as well as multiple co-morbidities stemming from Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrition offers a nontoxic long-term approach to chronic disease management, potential for reducing pain and inflammation, and supports…

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FASCIA AND NUTRITION

Remember we talked about our fascia being the “home” of inflammation, and henceforth the arena which will dictate our capacity to heal? Hippocrates said millennia ago “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food”? Unfortunately, modern Western medicine seems to have overlooked this basic tenet of human health, so we find ourselves living…

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Densification and Fibrosis

Now might be a good time to talk about the difference between densification and fibrosis. These terms are definitely NOT interchangeable! Both densification and fibrosis are capable of modifying the mechanical properties of deep fasciae and can damage the function of underlying muscles or organs, so an understanding and distinction between the two makes it…

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Hyaluronan

So, to carry on from last week’s exploration of hyaluronan, or as it was referred to as “highly ironic acid” by Robert Stern and his associates in their 2006 paper….. Hyaluronan is described as a non-Newtonian fluid. But what does that mean? It changes its flow behaviour under stress, and as such it is termed…

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Fascia and Stasis Part II

So last week we saw what happens at the level of the collagen in the perimysium (the deep fascial covering around the outside of muscles, encapsulating them like cling film) when we don’t move, and all at breathtaking speed! But there’s another aspect which must be taken into consideration, and that’s the reaction of hyaluronan…

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Fascia and Stasis Part I

To borrow from my recent presentation at the Australian Fascia Symposium, we all know we need to move, but how much is too much and how much is too little? Leon Chaitow (2012) described the basis of musculoskeletal dysfunction as either/or a combination of “overuse, misuse, disuse or abuse”, so today we’re going to focus…

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